When literature takes you by surprise: or the case against trigger warnings

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Stephanie Trigg

The strong emotional connections and resonances of literature can happen at any time.

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A makeshift memorial to Eurydice Dixon at Princes Park on June 16. Ellen Smith/AAP.

It was an ordinary lecture to first-year students, on “Women Writers and Modernism.” My brief was to introduce the different ways men and women responded to the social, intellectual and artistic challenges of the modernist movement.

About the author

Stephanie Trigg is Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor of English Literature at the University of Melbourne and a Chief Investigator with the Australian Research Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. She is author of several studies of Australian parliamentary practice and of Shame and Honor: A Vulgar History of the Order of the Garter (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012). She researches in the area of medieval literature, English and Australian literature, medievalism and the history of emotions.